MICHIGAN CITIZENS for COUGAR RECOGNITION
MACOMB County Sightings



07/10/03Denewith's Greenhouses, Macomb Township, 22 Mile Road .4 mile E of Hayes, .25 mile N of 22 Mile Road
10/01/0322 Mile Road 1/4 mile E of Hayes Road 1/4 mile N in soy bean field
04/10/0426 Mile and Romeo Plank in Country Club Subdivision, Ready to attack housecat
08/11/04Sterling Heights on Hayes Road immediately N of 18 Mile Road heading E across Hayes Road into Clinton Township
08/12/04Plaza South Drive directly across from Windsong Apartment b/w Telegraph Road and I-75
08/13/04I-94 b/w Metro Parkway and M-59 selfridge
12/29/04Delia Park area 18 mile and Dequindre Road, tracks
03/15/05Irving Street and 15-Mile Road, Observed by Detroit Police Officer Mark Amos. Video from patrol car of Animal Control; Click here to watch video and read analysis
04/20/05Inside River Bends Park near Shad Brush Nature Center
07/20/0516 Mile Road/Garfield, Saw twice
08/25/06Field, Saw twice
01/22/08200 feet East of intersection of Clinton River Road and Schoenherr Road; area close to Clinton River and Dodge Park. Crossed the road at 6:35 a.m.; estimated to be moving at around 30 mph based on car keeping pace in other lane.
05/15/08Just before bates Road in Chesterfield Township. Crossed in front of vehicle at 8:00 p.m.
10/07/08Watched cougar race across the road at 15 Mile Road east of Schoenherr where Red Run Drain crosses 15 Mile Road
05/08/10I-94 between 21 Mile Road and Cotton Road. Cougar was on the first step of back porch in crouching position ready to attack small Yorkshire Terrier dog. Owner scared cat away and gave chase through the creek area. Approximately 8:45 p.m.
Summer, 2011Candy A observes a cougar crossing from one side of the road to the other at Campground and 29 Mile at the Orchards Golf Course


Using information compiled by the North Dakota Game and Fish Department, it was determined that approximately 50% of anecdotal reports (as listed below), can be classified as probable or verified.
Reports by the public, when carefully screened for reliability, and used in conjunction with other information and evidence, can aid in assessing population status.
Thank you to the Michigan Wildlife Conservancy, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Retired DNR Forester Mike Zuidema, and the media for this valuable research information.




DENISE N. MASSEY